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Marius Lian

Marius Lian

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China cracks down on foreign NGOs

China cracks down on foreign NGOs

On Thursday, China approved strict new measures to control foreign non-government organizations, or NGOs in the country. According to state news reports, the new law, which restricts the work of foreign organizations and their local partners, will affect over 7,000 foreign nongovernmental groups. Foreign groups working in a diverse set of activities across Chinese civil society will now have to find an official Chinese sponsor and much register with the police.

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  • China   China (/ˈtʃaɪnə/; simplified Chinese: 中国; t...
  • China

    China (/ˈtʃaɪnə/; simplified Chinese: 中国; traditional Chinese: 中國; pinyin: Zhōngguó), officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a sovereign state located in East Asia. It is the world's most...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China' }

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  • NGOs in China
    This article is a list of domestic and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) operating in China.
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Vice President Biden makes a surprise visit to Iraq

Vice President Biden makes a surprise visit to Iraq

On Thursday, Vice President Joseph Biden made an unannounced visit to Iraq. The visit, aimed at aiding a faltering Iraqi prime minister and boost the military campaign against the Islamic State, marks the first time Biden has been in the country in almost five years. Biden met Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi at the Government Palace in Baghdad. Currently, Prime Minister Abadi and Parliament are locked in a stalemate over Abadi’s efforts to reconstitute his cabinet.

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  • Baghdad   Baghdad (Arabic: بغداد‎ Baġdād, Iraqi pronu...
  • Baghdad
    Baghdad (Arabic: بغداد‎ Baġdād, Iraqi pronunciation: [bɐʁˈd̪ɑːd̪]) is the capital of the Republic of Iraq, as well as the coterminous Baghdad Province. The population of Baghdad, as of 2011, is approx...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baghdad' }
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  • Joseph Biden, Jr.
    Joseph Robinette Biden, Jr. (/ˈdʒoʊsɨf rɒbɨˈnɛt ˈbaɪdən/; born November 20, 1942) is the 47th and current Vice President of the United States, jointly elected twice with President Barack Obama, and in office since 2009. A member of the Democratic Party, Biden represented Delaware as a United States Senator from 1973 until assuming the office of Vice President in 2009. Biden was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1942, and lived there for ten years before moving to Delaware. He became an attorney in 1969, and was elected to the New Castle County council in 1970. Biden was first elected to the Senate in 1972, and became the sixth-youngest senator in U.S. history. He was re-elected to the Senate six times, and was the fourth most senior senator at the time of his resignation to assume the Vice Presidency in 2009. Biden was a long-time member and former chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. His advocacy helped bring about U.S. military assistance and intervention during the Bosnian War. He opposed the Gulf War in 1991. He voted in favor of the Iraq War Resolution in 2002, but later proposed resolutions to alter U.S. strategy there. He has also served as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, dealing with issues related to drug policy, crime prevention, and civil liberties, and led the legislative efforts for creation of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, and the Violence Against Women Act. He chaired the Judiciary Committee during the contentious U.S. Supreme Court nominations of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas. Biden unsuccessfully sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988 and 2008, both times dropping out early in the race. Obama selected Biden to be the Democratic Party nominee for Vice President in the 2008 U.S. presidential election, which they won. Biden is the first Roman Catholic, and the first Delawarean, to become Vice President of the United States. As Vice President, Biden has been involved in Obama's decision-making process and held the oversight role for infrastructure spending from the Obama stimulus package aimed at counteracting the Great Recession. His ability to negotiate with Congressional Republicans played a key role in bringing about the bipartisan deals that resulted in the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010 that resolved a taxation deadlock, the Budget Control Act of 2011 that resolved that year's debt ceiling crisis, and the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 that addressed the impending "fiscal cliff". Obama and Biden were re-elected in 2012, since which time Biden has publicly considered running to succeed Obama as president in 2016. Throughout his career, Biden's political style has combined appeal to middle and working class voters with a penchant for gaffes.
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  • Haider Al-Abadi
    This is a redirect from a page that has been moved (renamed). This page was kept as a redirect to avoid breaking links, both internal and external, that may have been made to the old page name. For more information follow the category link.
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  • Iraq - US relations
    Iraq–United States relations are the diplomatic relations between Iraq and the United States. The US first recognized Iraq on January 9, 1930 when Charles G. Dawes, U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, signed the Anglo-American-Iraqi Convention in London.
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Volkswagen chief executive offers personal apology to Obama

Volkswagen chief executive offers personal apology to Obama

On Thursday, chief executive of Volkswagen Matthias Müller, said that he personally apologized to President Obama this week for the company’s cheating on emissions tests. Volkswagen is currently negotiating penalties with US officials for the scandal, and the company said that it has set aside 7 billion euros for legal costs worldwide. However, according to some analysts, that amount indicates that the company expects fines in the US to be much lower than expected.

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  • Volkswagen   Volkswagen (VW; German pronunciation: [ˈ...
  • Volkswagen

    Volkswagen (VW; German pronunciation: [ˈfɔlksˌvaːɡən]; /ˈvoʊlks.wæɡ.ən/) is a German automobile manufacturer headquartered in Wolfsburg, Lower Saxony, Germany. Established in 1937, Volkswagen is the top-selling and namesake marque of the Volkswagen Group, the holding company created in 1975 for the growing company, and is now the biggest automaker in both Germany and Europe.

    Volkswagen has three cars in the top 10 list of best-selling cars of all time compiled by the website 24/7 Wall St.: the Volkswagen Golf, the Volkswagen Beetle, and the Volkswagen Passat. With these three cars, Volkswagen has the most cars of any automobile manufacturer in the list that are still being manufactured.

    Volkswagen means "people's car" in German. Its current international slogan is "Das Auto" ("The Car").

    ^ "Top 10 Best Selling Cars of All Time". Autoguide.com. Retrieved 2013-12-02.

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  • Barack Obama
    Barack Hussein Obama II (/bəˈrɑːk huːˈseɪn oʊˈbɑːmə/; born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States, and the first African American to hold the office. Born in Honolulu, ...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barack_Obama' }
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‘Dirty Harry’ Takes Lead in Philippine's Presidential Election

‘Dirty Harry’ Takes Lead in Philippine's Presidential Election

Philippine presidential candidate, Rodrigo Duterte, is appearing as frontrunner in the Filipino presidential race despite inappropriate rape comments made earlier this month. Since, admirers from the country's top business groups have nicknamed Duterte as "Dirty Harry." According to Social Weather Stations' pre-election survey, support for Duterte rose 33 percent in April 18-20 poll from 27 percent in the March 30-April 2 survey.

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  • Philippine presidential election, 2016   The Philippi...
  • Philippine presidential election, 2016
    The Philippine presidential and vice presidential elections of 2016 is the next presidential election in the Philippines, scheduled on Monday, May 9, 2016. Incumbent President Benigno Aquino III is barred from seeking re-election, pursuant to the 1987 Philippine Constitution. Therefore, this election will determine the 16th President of the Philippines. The position of president and vice president are elected separately, and the winning candidates may come from different political parties. This will be the 16th presidential election in the Philippines since 1935, and the sixth sextennial presidential election since 1986. This will be a part of the 2016 general election where elections to the Senate, House of Representatives and local government above the barangay level, including the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao shall be held.
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  • Rodrigo Duterte
    Rodrigo "Rody" Roa Duterte (born March 28, 1945), nicknamed Digong, is a Filipino lawyer and politician of Visayan descent. Duterte is among the longest-serving mayors in the Philippines and has been mayor of Davao City, a highly urbanized city on Mindanao island, for 7 terms, totalling more than 22 years. He has also served as vice-mayor and congressman in the city. Enormously popular with the people due to his successful zero-tolerance policies against criminals, he earned the nickname "The Punisher". Over a period of 20 years, he turned Davao City from the murder capital of The Philippines to what tourism organisations now describe as “the most peaceful city in southeast Asia”. On November 21, 2015, Duterte declared his candidacy for President of the Philippines in the upcoming 2016 election.
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Apple's 13 years of quarterly growth come to an end

Apple's 13 years of quarterly growth come to an end

After 13 years of consecutive quarterly growth, Apple’s streak has ended. The company said on Tuesday that revenue for its second fiscal quarter, which ended in March, fell 13 percent to $50.6 billion. The slowdown is attributable to slowing iPhone sales. Apple faces challenges like market saturation, and product competition from other smartphone makers using Google’s Android operations systems.

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  • IPhone   iPhone (/ˈaɪfoʊn/ EYE-fohn) is a line of sma...
  • IPhone
    iPhone (/ˈaɪfoʊn/ EYE-fohn) is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. It runs Apple's iOS mobile operating system. The first generation iPhone was released on June 29, 2007; the mos...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPhone' }
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  • Apple Inc.

    Apple Inc. is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Cupertino, California, that designs, develops, and sells consumer electronics, computer software and personal computers. Its best-k...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Inc.' }

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Twenty-seven years after deadly soccer match, jury finds police at fault

Twenty-seven years after deadly soccer match, jury finds police at fault

On Thursday, a jury found that police were at fault for the deaths of 96 Liverpool soccer fans at a match in 1989. The fans were crushed and trampled to death at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England. Over 25 years after the incident, a jury has found that the victims had been “unlawfully killed” in part due to police mistakes, including errors in planning and executing security for the match.

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  • Hillsborough Stadium Disaster   The Hillsborough disa...
  • Hillsborough Stadium Disaster
    The Hillsborough disaster was a human crush that caused the deaths of 96 people and injured 766 others, at a football match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at the Hillsborough Stadium, Sheffield, England, on 15 April 1989. The match was the 1988–89 FA Cup semi-final, with Hillsborough, home ground of Sheffield Wednesday, selected as a neutral venue. In English football, most stadiums had steel fencing between the spectators and the playing field in order to prevent friendly and hostile pitch invasions. The crush occurred in pens in the Leppings Lane stand, allocated to Liverpool fans. The 1990 official inquiry into the disaster, the Taylor Report, concluded that "the main reason for the disaster was the failure of police control." Entry was possible only via one of seven decrepit turnstiles, a restriction that led to dangerous overcrowding outside the ground before kick-off. In an attempt to ease pressure outside the ground, Police Chief Superintendent David Duckenfield, the senior police officer responsible for the match, ordered an exit gate to be opened. The opened exit gate led to a tunnel marked "Standing", which led directly to the two already overcrowded enclosures. In previous years the tunnel had been closed off by police when the two central pens were full; however, on this occasion the tunnel was unmanned. The findings of the report resulted in the elimination of standing terraces at all major football stadiums in England, Wales and Scotland. It remains the worst stadium-related disaster in the history of English sports, and one of the world's worst football disasters. On the 20th anniversary of the disaster, government minister Andy Burnham called for the police, ambulance and all other public agencies to release documents that had not been made available to Lord Justice Taylor in 1989. This led to the formation of the Hillsborough Independent Panel, which in September 2012 concluded that Liverpool fans were not responsible for the deaths and that attempts had been made by the authorities to conceal what happened. The report revealed "multiple failures" by other emergency services and public bodies that contributed to the death toll. This led to a new inquest which on 26 April 2016, returned a verdict that the supporters were unlawfully killed due to deficiencies in policing and ambulance response on the day, as well as the stadium's design, and reiterated that supporters were not to blame for the deaths.
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  • Liverpool Football Club
    Liverpool Football Club (/ˈlɪvərpuːl/) is a Premier League football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, England. The club has won five European Cups, three UEFA Cups, three UEFA Super Cups, 18 League titles, seven FA Cups, a record eight League Cups, and 15 FA Community Shields. The club was founded in 1892 and joined the Football League the following year. The club has played at Anfield since its formation. Liverpool established itself as a major force in both English and European football during the 1970s and 1980s when Bill Shankly and Bob Paisley led the club to 11 League titles and seven European trophies. Under the management of Rafa Benítez and captained by Steven Gerrard Liverpool re-emerged as European champions once again, winning the 2005 UEFA Champions League Final against Milan in spite of being 3–0 down at half time. Liverpool was the ninth highest-earning football club in the world for 2013–14, with an annual revenue of €306 million, and the world's eighth most valuable football club in 2015, valued at $982 million. The club holds many long-standing rivalries, most notably the North West Derby against Manchester United and the Merseyside derby with Everton. The club's supporters have been involved in two major tragedies. The first was the Heysel Stadium disaster in 1985, where escaping fans were pressed against a collapsing wall in the Heysel Stadium, with 39 people—mostly Italians and Juventus fans—losing their lives, after which English clubs were given a five-year ban from European competition. The second was the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, where 96 Liverpool supporters lost their lives in a crush against perimeter fencing. The team changed from red shirts and white shorts to an all-red home strip in 1964 which has been used ever since. The club's anthem is "You'll Never Walk Alone".
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Prince tops the charts after his death

Prince tops the charts after his death

After his death on Thursday, Prince has rocketed to the top of the music charts. “The Very Best of Prince,” released in 2001, climbed to No. 1 on Billboard’s latest album chart with 100,000 sales and 292,000 streams in the US. “Purple Rain,” the album that secured Prince’s place among music legends, is No. 2 on the charts with 63,000 sales and 71,000 streams. In total, since his death, Prince has eight albums in the Top 200.

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  • Prince (artist)   Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 ...
  • Prince (artist)
    Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016), known by his mononym Prince, was an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and actor, serving as a major figure in popular music for over three decades. Prince was renowned as an innovator and was widely known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, and wide vocal range. He was widely regarded as the pioneer of Minneapolis sound. His music combined rock, R&B, soul, funk, hip hop, disco, psychedelia, jazz, and pop. Prince was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and developed an interest in music at an early age, writing his first song at age seven. After recording songs with his cousin's band 94 East, 19-year-old Prince recorded several unsuccessful demo tapes before releasing his debut album For You in 1978, under the guidance of manager Owen Husney. His 1979 album Prince went platinum due to the success of the singles "Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?" and "I Wanna Be Your Lover". His next three records—Dirty Mind (1980), Controversy (1981), and 1999 (1982)—continued his success, showcasing Prince's trademark of prominently sexual lyrics and incorporation of elements of funk, dance, and rock music. In 1984, he began referring to his backup band as The Revolution and released Purple Rain, which served as the soundtrack to his film debut of the same name. A prolific songwriter, Prince in the 1980s wrote songs for and produced work by many other acts, often under pseudonyms. After releasing the albums Around the World in a Day (1985) and Parade (1986), The Revolution disbanded and Prince released the critically acclaimed double album Sign "O" the Times (1987) as a solo artist. He released three more solo albums before debuting The New Power Generation band in 1991. He changed his stage name in 1993 to an unpronounceable symbol (), also known as the "Love Symbol". He then began releasing new albums at a faster pace to remove himself from contractual obligations to Warner Bros.; he released five records between 1994 and 1996 before signing with Arista Records in 1998. In 2000, he began referring to himself as "Prince" again. He released 15 albums since then, including his latest, HITnRUN Phase One, which was first released exclusively on the Tidal streaming service on September 7, 2015 before being released on CD on September 15, 2015 by NPG Records. Prince sold over 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling artists of all time. He won seven Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe, and an Academy Award. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the first year of his eligibility. Rolling Stone has ranked Prince at number 27 on its list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. He died at his Paisley Park recording studio and home in Chanhassen, Minnesota, near Minneapolis, on April 21, 2016, after suffering flu-like symptoms for several weeks.
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  • Purple Rain (album)
    Purple Rain is the sixth studio album by American recording artist Prince, the first to feature his backing band The Revolution, and is the soundtrack album to the 1984 film of the same name. It was released on June 25, 1984 by Warner Bros. Records. Purple Rain is regularly ranked among the best albums in music history and is widely regarded as Prince's magnum opus. Time magazine ranked it the 15th greatest album of all time in 1993, and it placed 18th on VH1's Greatest Rock and Roll Albums of All Time countdown. Rolling Stone magazine ranked it the second-best album of the 1980s and 76th on their list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. In 2007, the editors of Vanity Fair labeled it the best soundtrack of all time and Tempo magazine named it the greatest album of the 1980s. In 2012, Slant Magazine listed the album at #2 on its list of "Best Albums of the 1980s" behind only Michael Jackson's Thriller. The 1,000th issue of Entertainment Weekly dated July 4, 2008 listed Purple Rain at number one on their list of the top 100 best albums of the past 25 years. In 2013, the magazine also listed the album at number two on their list of the 100 Greatest Albums ever. The first two singles from Purple Rain, "When Doves Cry" and "Let's Go Crazy", topped the US singles charts and were hits around the world, while the title track went to number two on the Billboard Hot 100. The RIAA lists it as having gone platinum 13 times over. To date, it has sold over 22 million copies worldwide, becoming the sixth best-selling soundtrack album of all time. In 2012, the album was added to the Library of Congress's National Recording Registry list of sound recordings that "are culturally, historically, or aesthetically important".
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  • Billboard Top 100
    The Billboard Hot 100 is the music industry standard record chart in the United States for singles, published weekly by Billboard magazine. Chart rankings are based on radio play, online streaming, and sales (physical and digital). The weekly sales period was originally Monday to Sunday when Nielsen started tracking sales in 1991, but since July 2015, this has been changed from Friday to Thursday. Radio airplay, which unlike sales figures and streaming data, is readily available on a real-time basis and is tracked on a Monday to Sunday cycle (it was previously Wednesday to Tuesday). A new chart is compiled and officially released to the public by Billboard on Tuesdays. Example: Friday, January 1 – sales tracking-week begins, streaming tracking-week begins Monday, January 4 – airplay tracking-week begins Thursday, January 7 – sales tracking-week ends, streaming tracking-week ends Sunday, January 10 – airplay tracking-week ends Tuesday, January 12 – new chart released, with issue post-dated Saturday, January 23 The first number-one song of the Hot 100 was "Poor Little Fool" by Ricky Nelson on August 4, 1958. As of the issue for the week ending January 16, 2016, the Hot 100 has had 1,048 different number-one hits. Its current number-one is "Hello" by Adele.
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  • The Very Best Of Prince
    The Very Best of Prince is a greatest hits album by American recording artist Prince. It was released on July 31, 2001 by Warner Bros. Records. The album contains most of his commercially successful singles in their radio edits from 1979–1991 including the US number 1s "When Doves Cry", "Let's Go Crazy", "Kiss" and "Cream". The Very Best of Prince does not include the US number 1 hit "Batdance" most likely due to the licensing of the character Batman. AllMusic supposes that the Batman album is being unofficially written out of his discography.
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Prince Mohammad unveils sweeping economic plan for Saudi Arabia

Prince Mohammad unveils sweeping economic plan for Saudi Arabia

On Monday, Prince Mohammad bin Salman of Saudi Arabia unveiled an ambitious new plan to reduce the kingdom’s dependency on oil, boost the private sector, and reduce government subsidies. The plan comes in response to rising challenges faced by Saudi Arabia, including low oil prices, and a booming population that will add millions of job-seekers in coming years. Prince Mohammed overseas the economy of Saudi Arabia, and aims to make the sweeping transition while ensuring rising living standards for Saudi citizens.

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  • Saudi arabian economy   Saudi Arabia has an oil-based...
  • Saudi arabian economy
    Saudi Arabia has an oil-based economy with strong government control over major economic activities. Saudi Arabia possesses 18% of the world's proven petroleum reserves, ranks as the largest exporter of petroleum, and played a leading role in OPEC for many years. The petroleum sector accounts for almost all of Saudi government revenues, and export earnings. Most workers, particularly in the private sector, are foreigners.
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  • Saudi Arabia
    Saudi Arabia (/ˌsaʊdi əˈreɪbi.ə/ or /ˌsɔːdiː əˈreɪbi.ə/), officially known as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), is the largest Arab state in Western Asia by land area (approximately 2,150,000 km2 (83...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudi_Arabia' }
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  • Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud
    Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud (Arabic: محمد بن سلمان بن عبد العزيز آل سعود‎; born 31 August 1985 in Jeddah) is the deputy crown prince of Saudi Arabia, second deputy prime minister and the youngest minister of defense in the world. Mohammad is also chief of the House of Saud royal court, and chairman of the Council for Economic and Development Affairs. He has been described as the power behind the throne of his father, King Salman.
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Federal Judge upholds new North Carolina voter rules

Federal Judge upholds new North Carolina voter rules

On Monday, Judge Thomas D. Schroeder of Federal District Court in Winston-Salem upheld new election rules, including voter identification provisions and the repeal of a provision that allowed people to register and vote on the same day. The new rules are backed by North Carolina Republicans. Civil rights groups say they unfairly target African-Americans and other minorities.

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  • North Carolina (U.S. state)  
  • North Carolina (U.S. state)
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  • Voter ID
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  • Voter turnout
    Voter turnout is the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in an election. (Who is eligible varies by country, and should not be confused with the total adult population. For example, some countries discriminate based on sex, race, and/or religion. Age and citizenship are usually among the criteria.) After increasing for many decades, there has been a trend of decreasing voter turnout in most established democracies since the 1980s. In general, low turnout may be due to disenchantment, indifference, or contentment. Low turnout is often considered to be undesirable, and there is much debate over the factors that affect turnout and how to increase it. In spite of significant study into the issue, scholars are divided on reasons for the decline. Its cause has been attributed to a wide array of economic, demographic, cultural, technological, and institutional factors. There have been many efforts to increase turnout and encourage voting. Different countries have very different voter turnouts. For example, in the United States 2012 presidential election turnout was 55%. In Belgium, which has compulsory voting, and Malta, which does not, participation reaches 95%. These differences are caused by a mix of cultural and institutional factors.
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Afghanistan's vice president denied visa to US, highlighting the difficult relationship between the two countries

Afghanistan's vice president denied visa to US, highlighting the difficult relationship between the two countries

In April, vice president of Afghanistan Abdul Rashid Dostum planned to travel to the US to visit Washington and discuss strategies for defeating the Taliban. However, Dostum’s trip was cancelled after American officials threatened to deny his visa. The problem: Dostum has been accused of war crimes and is therefore not welcome in the US. The situation has added complexity to an already muddled relationship between the two countries. Afghanistan is almost completely depended on American military and financial support. Nearly 10,000 American troops serve in the country and the US sends tens of billions of dollars a year in assistance. The visa trouble highlights a central issue in the relationship between the two countries: the US has helped build an Afghan government full of the warlords and power brokers it set out to replace in the 1990s.

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  • Afghanistan   Afghanistan, officially the Islamic Rep...
  • Afghanistan

    Afghanistan, officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a landlocked country located within South Asia and Central Asia. It has a population of approximately 31 million people, making it the 42nd most populous country in the world. It is bordered by Pakistan in the south and east; Iran in the west; Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan in the north; and China in the far northeast. Its territory covers 652,000 km2 (252,000 sq mi), making it the 41st largest country in the world.

    Human habitation in Afghanistan dates back to the Middle Paleolithic Era, and the country's strategic location along the Silk Road connected it to the cultures of the Middle East and other parts of Asia. Through the ages the land has been home to various peoples and witnessed numerous military campaigns, notably by Alexander the Great, Muslim Arabs, Mongols, British, Soviet Russians, and in the modern-era by Western powers. The land also served as the source from which the Kushans, Hephthalites, Samanids, Saffarids, Ghaznavids, Ghorids, Khiljis, Mughals, Hotaks,Durranis, and others have risen to form major empires.

    The political history of the modern state of Afghanistan began with the Hotak and Durrani dynasties in the 18th century. In the late 19th century, Afghanistan became a buffer state in the "Great Game" between British India and theRussian Empire. Following the Third Anglo-Afghan War in 1919, King Amanullah and King Mohammed Zahir Shahattempted to modernize the country. A series of coups in the 1970s was followed by a Soviet invasion and a series of civil wars that devastated much of Afghanistan.

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  • Afghanistan-United States relations
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  • Abdul Rashid Dostum
    Abdul Rashid Dostum ( pronunciation : AHB-dəl rah-SHEED dohs-TOOM; Persian: عبدالرشید دوستم) (born 1954) is an Afghan warlord, former general, and an ethnic Uzbek who has served as Vice President of Afghanistan since 2014. He was previously part of the leadership council of the National Front of Afghanistan along with Ahmad Zia Massoud and Mohammad Mohaqiq, as well as chairman of his own political party, Junbish-e Milli-yi Islami-yi Afghanistan (National Islamic Movement of Afghanistan). He also served in the past as Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Afghan National Army, a role often viewed as ceremonial. During the Soviet war in Afghanistan, Dostum was a general in the Afghan army. He later became an independent warlord and leader of Afghanistan's Uzbek community. He participated in battles against the Mujahideen fighters in the 1980s as well as against the Taliban in the 1990s.
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Cleveland Settles Tamir Rice Lawsuit

Cleveland Settles Tamir Rice Lawsuit

On Monday, the city of Cleveland reached a $6 million settlement in the lawsuit over the death of 12 year old Tamir Rice, who was shot by a police officer while playing with a toy gun in November 2014. The city will pay $3 million to his family this year, and $3 million next year. In the settlement, there was no issue of wrongdoing on behalf of the officers.

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  • Police Brutality   Police brutality is the abuse ...
  • Police Brutality

    Police brutality is the abuse of authority by the unwarranted infliction of excessive force by personnel involved in various aspects of law enforcement while in performance of their official duties. The term is also applied to abuses by corrections personnel in municipal, state and federal penal facilities including military prisons.

    While the term police brutality is usually applied in the context of causing physical harm, it may also involve psychological harm through the use of intimidation tactics beyond the scope of officially sanctioned police procedure. In the past those who engaged in police brutality may have acted with the implicit approval of the local legal system, e.g. during the Civil Rights era. In the modern era individuals who engage in cases of police brutality may do so with the tacit approval of their superiors or they may be rogue officers; in either case they may perpetrate their actions under color of law, and more often than not engage in a subsequent cover-up of their illegal activity.

    The word "brutality" has several meanings; the sense used here (savage cruelty) was first used in 1633. The first known use of the term "police brutality" was in the New York Times in 1893, describing a police officer's beating of a civilian.

    Efforts to combat police brutality focus on various aspects of the police subculture, and the aberrant psychology which may manifest itself when individuals are placed in a position of absolute authority over others.

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  • Tamir Rice
    This is a redirect from a title that is a shortened form of a person's full name, a book title or other more complete article title. Use this rcat (not {{R from initialism}}) to tag redirects that are the initials of a person's name. For more information follow the category link.
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  • Police Brutality Victims
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  • Cleveland, OH
    This is a redirect from a US postal abbreviation to its associated municipality. For more information follow the category link.
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Tom Brady's Suspension Reinstated

Tom Brady's Suspension Reinstated

On Monday, a federal court of appeals ruled in favor of the NFL in the "Deflategate" case. This ruling reinstated New England Patriots Quarterback Tom Brady original four-game suspension. In May 2015, an independent investigator found that it was "more probable than not" that Brady was involved in deliberately taking the air out of the footballs used in that year's Super Bowl.

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  • NFL (National Football League)   The National Footb...
  • NFL (National Football League)

    The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from the week after Labor Day to the week after Christmas, with each team playing sixteen games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference (four division winners and two wild card teams) advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

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  • "Deflategate"

    Deflategate is a controversy in the National Football League (NFL), stemming from accusations that the New England Patriots tampered with footballs used in the American Football Conference (AFC) Championship Game against theIndianapolis Colts on January 18, 2015. The league announced on May 11, 2015, that it would suspend Patriots quarterback Tom Brady for four games of the upcoming 2015 regular season for his alleged part in the scandal. After NFL commissioner Roger Goodell upheld the suspension in an internal appeal, a federal court case on the matter is underway. Goodell's suspension vacated, due to absence of "...the requisites of fairness and due process.", September 3, 2015[1].

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deflategate

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  • Tom Brady
    Thomas Edward Patrick "Tom" Brady, Jr. (born August 3, 1977) is an American football quarterback for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). After playing college football for ...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Brady' }
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In Kandahar, electricity falters

In Kandahar, electricity falters

Power is running out in Afghanistan’s second largest city, Kandahar, despite the fact that providing electricity was a key part of US strategy in the city and cost the US billions. “Electricity is key to developing the economy. Electricity is key to industry,” John Sopok, the Special Inspector General of Afghanistan Reconstruction, said on America Tonight. But after American forces left, Afghans couldn’t afford to run the expensive diesel generators the US installed, so the generators often lay silent. Often power goes off without warning, shutting down machines and corrupting the software that runs them.

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  • Afghanistan-United States relations  
  • Afghanistan-United States relations
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  • Kandahar
    Kandahar or Qandahar (Pashto: کندهار‎ Kandahār, Persian: قندهار, Qandahār, known in older literature as Candahar) is the second-largest city in Afghanistan, with a population of about 491,500 as of 2012. Formerly called Alexandria Arachosia, the city is named after Alexander the Great, who founded it in 329 BCE around a small ancient Arachosian town. Kandahar is the capital of Kandahar Province, located in the south of the country at an altitude of 1,010 m above sea level. The Arghandab River runs along the west of the city. Kandahar is one of the most culturally significant cities of the Pashtuns and has been their traditional seat of power for more than 200 years. It is a major trading center for sheep, wool, cotton, silk, felt, food grains, fresh and dried fruit, and tobacco. The region produces fine fruits, especially pomegranates and grapes, and the city has plants for canning, drying, and packing fruit, and is a major source of marijuana and hashish. The area is believed to be the birthplace of cannabis indica. Kandahar has an international airport and extensive road links with Lashkar Gah and Herat to the west, Ghazni and Kabul to the northeast, Tarinkot to the north, and Quetta in neighboring Balochistan to the south. The region around Kandahar is one of the oldest known human settlements. Alexander the Great had laid-out the foundation of what is now Old Kandahar in the 4th century BC and gave it the Ancient Greek name Αλεξάνδρεια Aραχωσίας (Alexandria of Arachosia). Many empires have long fought over the city due to its strategic location along the trade routes of southern, central and western Asia. In 1709, Mirwais Hotak made the region an independent kingdom and turned Kandahar into the capital of the Hotak dynasty. In 1747, Ahmad Shah Durrani, founder of the last Afghan empire, made it the capital of modern Afghanistan. Since the 1978 Marxist revolution, the city has been a magnet for groups such as the Pakistan-based Haqqani network, Quetta Shura, Hezbi Islami, al-Qaida and other terrorist groups, many of which are believed to receive support from Pakistan's ISI spy network. From late 1994 to 2001, it served as the capital of the Taliban government until they were toppled by US-led NATO forces during Operation Enduring Freedom in late 2001 and replaced by the government of President Hamid Karzai.
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Canadian Hostage Killed in the Phillippines

Canadian Hostage Killed in the Phillippines

Canadian Prime Minister, John Trudeau, announced that Canadian hostage, John Ridsdel, who was being held hostage by ISIS militants, has been killed. The militants had demanded ransom in a video showing Ridsdel among three other hostages, but when they did not receive such ransom, Ridsdel was brutally murdered.

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  • ISIS in the Philippines  
  • ISIS in the Philippines
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  • ISIS beheadings

    Beginning in 2014, a number of people from various countries were beheaded by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS), a radical Sunni Islamist group operating in Iraq and parts of Syria.

    In January 2015, a copy of an ISIL penal code surfaced describing the penalties it enforces in areas under its control, including beheadings. Beheading videos have been frequently posted by ISIL members to social media. Several of the videoed beheadings were conducted by Mohammed Emwazi, whom the media had referred to as "Jihadi John" before his identification.

    The beheadings received wide coverage around the world and attracted international condemnation. Political scientist Max Abrahms posited that ISIL may be using well-publicized beheadings as a means of differentiating itself from Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI), and identifying itself with Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the al-Qaeda member who beheaded Daniel Pearl. The publicised beheadings represent a small proportion of a larger total of people killed following capture by ISIL.

    ^ Saul, Heather (January 22, 2015). "Isis publishes penal code listing amputation, crucifixion and stoning as punishments - and vows to vigilantly enforce it". The Independent (London).

    ^ "Staffer, Crisis, and Jake Hume. "Balance of Powers: Syria." (2014)." (PDF). Retrieved 2015-03-04.

    ^ "Celso, Anthony N. "Jihadist Organizational Failure and Regeneration: the Transcendental Role of Takfiri Violence."" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-03-04.

    ^ Taylor, Adam (August 21, 2014). "From Daniel Pearl to James Foley: The modern tactic of Islamist beheadings". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on September 21, 2014. Retrieved September 21, 2014.

    ^ Cumming-Bruce, Nick (2 October 2014). "5,500 Iraqis Killed Since Islamic State Began Its Military Drive, U.N. Says". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 August 2015.

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  • ISIL/ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant)

    The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL /ˈaɪsəl/; Arabic: الدولة الإسلامية في العراق والشام‎), also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria or the Islamic State of Iraq and ash-Sham (ISIS /ˈaɪsɪs/), or simply as the Islamic State, is an Islamic extremist group controlling territory in Iraq and Syria, with limited territorial control in Libya and Nigeria. The group also operates or has affiliates in many other parts of the world, including Southeast Asia.

    The group is known in Arabic as ad-Dawlah al-Islāmiyah fīl-ʿIrāq wash-Shām, leading to the acronym Da'ish, Da'eesh, or DAESH (داعش, Arabic pronunciation: [ˈdaːʕiʃ]), the Arabic equivalent of "ISIL". On 29 June 2014, the group proclaimed itself to be a worldwide caliphate, with Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi being named its caliph, and renamed itself "Islamic State" (الدولة الإسلامية, ad-Dawlah al-Islāmiyah). The new name and the idea of a caliphate has been widely criticised and condemned, with the United Nations, various governments, and mainstream Muslim groups all refusing to acknowledge it. As caliphate, it claims religious, political and military authority over all Muslims worldwide and that "the legality of all emirates, groups, states, and organisations, becomes null by the expansion of the khilāfah's [caliphate's] authority and arrival of its troops to their areas". Many Islamic and non-Islamic communities judge the group to be unrepresentative of Islam.

    The United Nations has held ISIL responsible for human rights abuses and war crimes, and Amnesty International has reported ethnic cleansing by the group on a "historic scale". The group has been designated as a terrorist organisation by the United Nations, the European Union, the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Canada, Indonesia, Malaysia, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Syria, Egypt, India, and Russia. Over 60 countries are directly or indirectly waging war against ISIL.

    The group originated as Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad in 1999, which pledged allegiance to al-Qaeda in 2004. The group participated in the Iraqi insurgency, which had followed the March 2003 invasion of Iraq. In January 2006, it joined other Sunni insurgent groups to form the Mujahideen Shura Council, which in October 2006 proclaimed the formation of the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI).

    Under the leadership of al-Baghdadi, the ISI sent delegates into Syria in August 2011 after the Syrian Civil War began in March 2011. This group named itself Jabhat an-Nuṣrah li-Ahli ash-Shām or al-Nusra Front, and established a large presence in Sunni-majority areas of Syria, within the governorates of Ar-Raqqah, Idlib, Deir ez-Zor, and Aleppo.

    In April 2013, al-Baghdadi announced the merger of his ISI with al-Nusra Front, and announced that the name of the reunited group was now the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). However, both Abu Mohammad al-Julani and Ayman al-Zawahiri, the leaders of al-Nusra and al-Qaeda respectively, rejected the merger. After an eight-month power struggle, al-Qaeda cut all ties with ISIL on 3 February 2014, citing its failure to consult and "notorious intransigence".

    ISIL is known for its well-funded web and social media propaganda, which includes Internet videos of beheadings of soldiers, civilians, journalists and aid workers, as well as the deliberate destruction of cultural heritage sites.

    The group gained notoriety after it drove the Iraqi government forces out of key western cities in Iraq. In Syria, it conducted ground attacks against both government forces and rebel factions in the Syrian Civil War. It gained those territories after an offensive, initiated in early 2014, which senior US military commanders and members of the US House Committee on Foreign Affairs saw as a re-emergence of Sunni insurgents and al-Qaeda militants. Iraq's territorial loss almost caused a collapse of the Iraqi government and prompted renewal of US military action in Iraq.

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  • Abu Sayyaf

    Abu Sayyaf (/ˌɑːbuː/ /sɑːˌjɔːf/; Arabic: جماعة أبو سياف‎; Jamāʿah Abū Sayyāf, ASG, Filipino: Grupong Abu Sayyaf) is a militant group based in and around Jolo and Basilan islands in the southwestern part of the Philippines, where for more than four decades, Moro groups have been engaged in an insurgency for an independent province in the country. The group is considered very violent, and was responsible for the Philippines' worst terrorist attack, the bombing of Superferry 14 in 2004, which killed 116 people. The name of the group is derived from the Arabic ابو, abu ("father of") and sayyaf ("swordsmith"). As of 2012, the group was estimated to have between 200 and 400 members, down from 1250 in 2000. They use mostly improvised explosive devices, mortars, and automatic rifles.

    Since its inception in 1991, the group has carried out bombings, kidnappings, assassinations, and extortion in what they describe as their fight for an independent Islamic province in the Philippines. They have also been involved in criminal activities, including kidnapping, rape, child sexual assault, forced marriage, drive-by shootings, extortion, and drug trafficking, and the goals of the group "appear to have alternated over time between criminal objectives and a more ideological intent".

    The group has been designated as a terrorist group by the United Nations, Australia, Canada, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States. In 2002, fighting Abu Sayyaf became a mission of the American military's Operation Enduring Freedom and part of the Global War on Terrorism. Several hundred United States soldiers are also stationed in the area to mainly train local forces in counter terror and counter guerrilla operations, but as a status of forces agreement and under Philippine law are not allowed to engage in direct combat.

    The group was founded by Abdurajik Abubakar Janjalani, and led after his death in 1998 by his younger brother Khadaffy Janjalani who was killed in 2007. On 23 July 2014, Abu Sayyaf leader Isnilon Totoni Hapilon swore an oath of loyalty to Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of ISIL. In September 2014, the group began kidnapping people to ransom, in the name of ISIL.

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ICC to Investigate Violence in Burundi

ICC to Investigate Violence in Burundi

According to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, approximately 440 people have been killed in Burundi since last April. The international war crimes court will investigate deadly violence in Burundi in which resulted with hundreds of thousands of people fleeing from the country.

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  • Burundi   Burundi (/bəˈrʊndɨ/ or /bəˈrʌndi/), officia...
  • Burundi
    Burundi (/bəˈrʊndɨ/ or /bəˈrʌndi/), officially the Republic of Burundi (Kirundi: Republika y'Uburundi, [buˈɾundi]; French: République du Burundi, [buʁundi] or [byʁyndi]), is a landlocked country in the African Great Lakes region of Southeast Africa, bordered by Rwanda to the north, Tanzania to the east and south, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west. It is also sometimes considered part of Central Africa. Burundi's capital is Bujumbura. Although the country is landlocked, much of the southwestern border is adjacent to Lake Tanganyika. The Twa, Hutu and Tutsi peoples have lived in Burundi for at least five hundred years. For more than 200 years, Burundi had an indigenous kingdom. At the beginning of the twentieth century, Germany colonized the region. After the First World War and its defeat, it ceded the territory to Belgium. The latter ruled Burundi and Rwanda as a European colony known as Ruanda-Urundi. Their intervention exacerbated social differences between the Tutsi and Hutu, which contributed to political unrest in the region. There was civil war in Burundi as it fought for independence in the middle of the twentieth century. Presently, Burundi is governed as a presidential representative democratic republic. Burundi is one of the five poorest countries in the world. It has one of the lowest per capita GDPs of any nation in the world. The country has suffered from warfare, corruption and poor access to education. Burundi is densely populated and has had substantial emigration as young people seek opportunities elsewhere. According to a 2012 DHL Global Connectedness Index, Burundi is the least globalized of 140 surveyed countries. According to the Global Hunger Index of 2013, Burundi has an indicator ratio of 38.8, earning the nation the distinction of being the hungriest country in the world in terms of percentage.
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  • Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

    The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) is a United Nations agency that works to promote and protect the human rights that are guaranteed under international law and stipulated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. The office was established by the UN General Assembly on 20 December 1993 in the wake of the 1993 World Conference on Human Rights.

    The office is headed by the High Commissioner for Human Rights, who co-ordinates human rights activities throughout the UN System and supervises the Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland. As of 1 September 2014, the current High Commissioner is Prince Zeid bin Ra'ad. The General Assembly approved on 16 June 2014 his appointment by the United Nations Secretary-General. He is the seventh individual to lead the OHCHR and the first Asian, Muslim, Arab and Prince to do so.

    In 2012-2013, the agency had a budget of US$177.3 million and 1,000 employees based in Geneva. It is an ex-officio member of the Committee of the United Nations Development Group.

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  • International Criminal Court
    The International Criminal Court (ICC or ICCt) is an intergovernmental organization and international tribunal that sits in The Hague in the Netherlands. The ICC has the jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. The ICC is intended to complement existing national judicial systems and it may therefore only exercise its jurisdiction when certain conditions are met, such as when national courts are unwilling or unable to prosecute criminals or when the United Nations Security Council or individual states refer investigations to the Court. The ICC began functioning on 1 July 2002, the date that the Rome Statute entered into force. The Rome Statute is a multilateral treaty which serves as the ICC's foundational and governing document. States which become party to the Rome Statute, for example by ratifying it, become member states of the ICC. Currently, there are 123 states which are party to the Rome Statute and therefore members of the ICC. The ICC has four principal organs: the Presidency, the Judicial Divisions, the Office of the Prosecutor, and the Registry. The President is the most senior judge chosen by his or her peers in the Judicial Division, which hears cases before the Court. The Office of the Prosecutor is headed by the Prosecutor who investigates crimes and initiates proceedings before the Judicial Division. The Registry is headed by the Registrar and is charged with managing all the administrative functions of the ICC, including the headquarters, detention union, and public defense office. The Office of the Prosecutor has opened nine official investigations and is also conducting an additional nine preliminary examinations. Thus far, 36 individuals have been indicted in the ICC, including Ugandan rebel leader Joseph Kony, Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir, Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, and Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo. Since all of the official investigations have been in Africa, the Office of the Prosecutor has been accused of selective enforcement and Western imperialism towards African countries.
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Remains of an ancient Roman villa discovered beneath a lawn in England

Remains of an ancient Roman villa discovered beneath a lawn in England

A family in Wiltshire, England uncovered the remains of a posh Roman villa under their yard when they began digging to lay electric cables. The family called the local council, which sent archaeologists to examine the find. During an eight-day dig at the site, archaeologists uncovered coins, jewelry, potter, a well, under-floor heating pipes and shells of hundreds of oysters and whelks. Historic England, a government body, called the find “unparalleled in recent years,” in part due to the fact that the villa had remained largely undisturbed. Experts from the Salisbury Museum in Wiltshire and Historic England believe that the find is one of the largest Roman villas discovered in England.

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  • Roman Villa   A Roman villa was a country house built...
  • Roman Villa
    A Roman villa was a country house built for the upper class in the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire.
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  • Archaeology
    Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of human activity in the past, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data that has been left behind by past human populations, which includes artifacts, architecture, biofacts (also known as eco-facts) and cultural landscapes (the archaeological record). Because archaeology employs a wide range of different procedures, it can be considered to be both a social science and a humanity, and in the United States, it is thought of as a branch of anthropology, although in Europe, it is viewed as a separate discipline. Archaeology studies human prehistory and history from the development of the first stone tools in eastern Africa 4 million years ago up until recent decades. (Archaeology does not include the discipline of paleontology). It is of most importance for learning about prehistoric societies, when there are no written records for historians to study, making up over 99% of total human history, from the Paleolithic until the advent of literacy in any given society. Archaeology has various goals, which range from studying human evolution to cultural evolution and understanding culture history. The discipline involves surveying, excavation and eventually analysis of data collected to learn more about the past. In broad scope, archaeology relies on cross-disciplinary research. It draws upon anthropology, history, art history, classics, ethnology, geography, geology, linguistics, semiology, physics, information sciences, chemistry, statistics, paleoecology, paleontology, paleozoology, paleoethnobotany, and paleobotany. Archaeology developed out of antiquarianism in Europe during the 19th century, and has since become a discipline practiced across the world. Since its early development, various specific sub-disciplines of archaeology have developed, including maritime archaeology, feminist archaeology and archaeoastronomy, and numerous different scientific techniques have been developed to aid archaeological investigation. Nonetheless, today, archaeologists face many problems, such as dealing with pseudoarchaeology, the looting of artifacts, a lack of public interest, and opposition to the excavation of human remains.
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  • Wiltshire, England
    Wiltshire (/ˈwɪltʃər/ or /ˈwɪltʃɪər/) is a county in South West England with an area of 3,485 km2 (1,346 square miles). It is landlocked and borders the counties of Dorset, Somerset, Hampshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire. Until 1930 the county town was Wilton but Wiltshire Council is now based at Trowbridge. Wiltshire is characterised by its high downland and wide valleys. Salisbury Plain is noted for being the location of the Stonehenge and Avebury stone circles and other ancient landmarks, and as a training area for the British Army. The city of Salisbury is notable for its mediaeval cathedral. Important country houses open to the public include Longleat, near Warminster, and the National Trust's Stourhead, near Mere.
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Obama Pleads for Europe to Remain United

Obama Pleads for Europe to Remain United

On Monday, President Barack Obama urged Europe to remain united for the benefit of the world, emphasizing that a united Europe would help maintain international order. During Obama's visit to London, he pressured Great Britain to stay in the 28-nation European Union, which would help avoid potential political and economical consequences.

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  • President Barack Hussein Obama   Barack Hussein Obama...
  • President Barack Hussein Obama
    Barack Hussein Obama II (US /bəˈrɑːk huːˈseɪn ɵˈbɑːmə/; born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States, and the first African American to hold the office. Born in Honolulu, Hawaii, Obama is a graduate of Columbia University and Harvard Law School, where he served as president of the Harvard Law Review. He was a community organizer in Chicago before earning his law degree. He worked as a civil rights attorney and taught constitutional law at University of Chicago Law School from 1992 to 2004. He served three terms representing the 13th District in the Illinois Senate from 1997 to 2004, running unsuccessfully for the United States House of Representatives in 2000. In 2004, Obama received national attention during his campaign to represent Illinois in the United States Senate with his victory in the March Democratic Party primary, his keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in July, and his election to the Senate in November. He began his presidential campaign in 2007 and, after a close primary campaign against Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2008, he won sufficient delegates in the Democratic Party primaries to receive the presidential nomination. He then defeated Republican nominee John McCain in the general election, and was inaugurated as president on January 20, 2009. Nine months after his election, Obama was named the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. During his first two years in office, Obama signed into law economic stimulus legislation in response to the Great Recession in the form of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010. Other major domestic initiatives in his first term included the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, often referred to as "Obamacare"; the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act; and the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010. In foreign policy, Obama ended U.S. military involvement in the Iraq War, increased U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan, signed the New START arms control treaty with Russia, ordered U.S. military involvement in Libya in opposition to Muammar Gaddafi, and ordered the military operation that resulted in the death of Osama bin Laden. In January 2011, the Republicans regained control of the House of Representatives as the Democratic Party lost a total of 63 seats; and, after a lengthy debate over federal spending and whether or not to raise the nation's debt limit, Obama signed the Budget Control Act of 2011 and the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. Obama was reelected president in November 2012, defeating Republican nominee Mitt Romney, and was sworn in for a second term on January 20, 2013. During his second term, Obama has promoted domestic policies related to gun control in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, and has called for greater inclusiveness for LGBT Americans, while his administration has filed briefs which urged the Supreme Court to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 and California's Proposition 8 as unconstitutional. In foreign policy, Obama ordered U.S. military involvement in Iraq in response to gains made by the Islamic State in Iraq after the 2011 withdrawal from Iraq, continued the process of ending U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan, and normalized U.S. relations with Cuba.
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  • European Union

    The European Union (EU) is an economic and political union of 28 member states that are primarily located in Europe. The EU operates through a system of supranational independent institutions and inte...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Union' }

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  • United Kingdom

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain /ˈbrɪ.tən/, is a sovereign state located off the north-western coast of continental Europ...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom' }

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New study: world's largest primate on the brink of extinction

New study: world's largest primate on the brink of extinction

New findings compiled by an international team of conservationists reveal the dire plight of the Grauer gorilla, the world’s largest primate. Grauer’s gorilla populations have fallen 77 percent over the last 20 years, according to the most recent assessment. Now, less than 3,800 of the gorillas exist in the wild. violent conflict in the jungles of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo have made it all but impossible for conservationists to monitor the species, until a recent lull in the violence allowed them to complete this latest assessment.

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  • Conservation   Conservation is the act of preserving,...
  • Conservation
    Conservation is the act of preserving, guarding, or protecting; wise use. Conservation may refer to: Main usage: Conservation (ethic) of biodiversity, environment, and natural resources, including protection and management Other usage: Conservation (cultural heritage) or Art conservation, protection and restoration of cultural heritage, including works of art and architecture, as well as archaeological and historical artifacts Conservation law, measurable property of isolated physical system that does not change as the system evolves, including conservation of energy, mass, momentum, electric charge, subatomic particles, and fundamental symmetries
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  • Grauer's gorilla
    Grauer's gorilla, formerly known as the eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) is a subspecies of eastern gorilla endemic to the mountainous forests of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Important populations of this gorilla live in the Kahuzi-Biega and Maiko National Parks and their adjacent forests, the Tayna Gorilla Reserve, the Usala forest and on the Itombwe Massif. It is the largest of the four gorilla subspecies. It has jet black coats like the mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei), although the hair is shorter on the head and body. The male's coat, like that of other gorillas, turns silver at the back as the animal matures. There are many more western lowland gorillas than the eastern variety; compared to over 100,000 western lowland gorillas, there are only about 5,000 eastern lowland gorillas in the wild. Outside the native range, only two females are in captivity at the Antwerp Zoo in Belgium.
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  • Primates
    A primate (/ˈpraɪmeɪt/ PRY-mayt) is a mammal of the order Primates (Latin: "prime, first rank"). In taxonomy, primates include two distinct lineages, strepsirrhines and haplorhines. Primates arose from ancestors that lived in the trees of tropical forests; many primate characteristics represent adaptations to life in this challenging three-dimensional environment. Most primate species remain at least partly arboreal. With the exception of humans, who inhabit every continent except for Antarctica, most primates live in tropical or subtropical regions of the Americas, Africa and Asia. They range in size from Madame Berthe's mouse lemur, which weighs only 30 g (1 oz), to the eastern gorilla, weighing over 200 kg (440 lb). Based on fossil evidence, the earliest known true primates, represented by the genus Teilhardina, date to 55.8 million years old. An early close primate relative known from abundant remains is the Late Paleocene Plesiadapis, c. 55–58 million years old. Molecular clock studies suggest that the primate branch may be even older, originating near the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary or around 63–74 mya. The order Primates was traditionally divided into two main groupings: prosimians and anthropoids (simians). Prosimians have characteristics more like those of the earliest primates, and include the lemurs of Madagascar, lorisoids, and tarsiers. Simians include monkeys, apes and hominins. More recently, taxonomists have preferred to split primates into the suborder Strepsirrhini, or wet-nosed primates, consisting of non-tarsier prosimians, and the suborder Haplorhini, or dry-nosed primates, consisting of tarsiers and the simians. Simians are divided into two groups: catarrhine (narrow-nosed) monkeys and apes of Africa and southeastern Asia and platyrrhine ("flat-nosed") or New World monkeys of South and Middle America. Catarrhines consist of Old World monkeys (such as baboons and macaques), gibbons and great apes; New World monkeys include the capuchin, howler and squirrel monkeys. Humans are the only extant catarrhines to have spread successfully outside of Africa, South Asia, and East Asia, although fossil evidence shows many other species were formerly present in Europe. New primate species are still being discovered. More than 25 species were taxonomically described in the decade of the 2000s and eleven have been described since 2010. Considered generalist mammals, primates exhibit a wide range of characteristics. Some primates (including some great apes and baboons) are primarily terrestrial rather than arboreal, but all species possess adaptations for climbing trees. Locomotion techniques used include leaping from tree to tree, walking on two or four limbs, knuckle-walking, and swinging between branches of trees (brachiation). Primates are characterized by large brains relative to other mammals, as well as an increased reliance on stereoscopic vision at the expense of smell, the dominant sensory system in most mammals. These features are more developed in monkeys and apes and noticeably less so in lorises and lemurs. Three-color vision has developed in some primates. Most also have opposable thumbs and some have prehensile tails. Many species are sexually dimorphic; differences include body mass, canine tooth size, and coloration. Primates have slower rates of development than other similarly sized mammals and reach maturity later, but have longer lifespans. Depending on the species, adults may live in solitude, in mated pairs, or in groups of up to hundreds of members.
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  • Democratic Republic of Congo
    The Democratic Republic of the Congo (/ˈkɒŋɡoʊ/; French: République démocratique du Congo French pronunciation: ​[kɔ̃ɡo]), also known as DR Congo, DRC, DROC, RDC, East Congo, Congo-Kinshasa, or simply Congo is a country located in Central Africa. From 1965 to 1997 it was named Zaïre. It borders the Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and South Sudan to the north, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania to the East, Zambia and Angola to the south and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. It is the second largest country in Africa by area and the eleventh largest in the world. With a population of over 75 million, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is the most populated officially Francophone country, the fourth most populated nation in Africa and the nineteenth most populated country in the world. The Congolese Civil Wars, which began in 1996, brought about the end of Mobutu Sese Seko's 31-year reign and devastated the country. The wars ultimately involved nine African nations, multiple groups of UN peacekeepers and twenty armed groups, and resulted in the deaths of 5.4 million people. The Democratic Republic of Congo is extremely rich in natural resources, but political instability, a lack of infrastructure and a culture of corruption have limited development, extraction and exploitation efforts. Besides the capital, Kinshasa, the other major cities, Lubumbashi and Mbuji-Mayi, are both mining communities. DR Congo's largest export is raw minerals, with China accepting over 50% of DRC's exports in 2012. As of 2013, according to the Human Development Index (HDI), DR Congo has a low level of human development, ranking 186 out of 187 countries.
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Gannet makes $388 million-plus bid for Tribune Publishing

On Monday, newspaper publisher Gannet announced its interest in buying Tribune Publishing for over $388 million. The deal would give the owner of USA Today control of serval prominent news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, and the Chicago Tribune. However, Gannett also said that Tribune has so far refused to begin “constructive discussions” about the potential deal since first offering to purchase the company earlier in April.

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  • Mergers and Acquisitions   Mergers and acquisitions a...
  • Mergers and Acquisitions

    Mergers and acquisitions are both aspects of strategic management, corporate finance and management dealing with the buying, selling, dividing and combining of different companies and similar entities that can help an enterprise grow rapidly in its sector or location of origin, or a new field or new location, without creating a subsidiary, other child entity or using a joint venture.

    M&A can be defined as a type of restructuring in that they result in some entity reorganization with the aim to provide growth or positive value. Consolidation of an industry or sector occurs when widespread M&A activity concentrates the resources of many small companies into a few larger ones, such as occurred with the automotive industry between 1910 and 1940.

    The distinction between a "merger" and an "acquisition" has become increasingly blurred in various respects (particularly in terms of the ultimate economic outcome), although it has not completely disappeared in all situations. From a legal point of view, a merger is a legal consolidation of two companies into one entity, whereas an acquisition occurs when one company takes over another and completely establishes itself as the new owner (in which case the target company still exists as an independent legal entity controlled by the acquirer). Either structure can result in the economic and financial consolidation of the two entities. In practice, a deal that is an acquisition for legal purposes may be euphemistically called a "merger of equals" if both CEOs agree that joining together is in the best interest of both of their companies, while when the deal is unfriendly (that is, when the target company does not want to be purchased) it is almost always regarded as an "acquisition".

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  • Gannett Co
    Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean in Greater Washington DC. It is the largest U.S. newspaper publisher as measured by total daily circulation. Its assets include the national newspaper USA Today and the erstwhile weekly USA Weekend. Its largest non-national newspaper is The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, Arizona. Other significant newspapers include The Indianapolis Star, The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Tennessean in Nashville, Tennessee, The Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, the Democrat and Chronicle in Rochester, NY, The Des Moines Register, the Detroit Free Press and The News-Press in Fort Myers. In 2015, Gannett spun off its broadcast and internet media divisions into an independent publicly-traded company called Tegna.
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  • Tribune Publishing
    Tribune Publishing Company is an American newspaper and print media publishing company based in Chicago, Illinois. Among other publications, the company's portfolio includes the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Orlando Sentinel, Sun-Sentinel [South Florida], The Baltimore Sun, The Morning Call [Allentown, Pennsylvania], Hartford Courant, and the San Diego Union-Tribune. It also publishes several local newspapers in these metropolitan regions, which are organized in subsidiary groups. It is the nation's third-largest newspaper publisher (behind Gannett, and The McClatchy Company), with ten daily newspapers and commuter tabloids located throughout the United States. Originally incorporated in 1847 with the founding of the Chicago Tribune, Tribune Publishing formerly operated as a division of the Tribune Company, a Chicago-based multimedia conglomerate, until it was spun off into a separate public company in August 2014.
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Ted Cruz and John Kasich Team Up to Defeat Trump in Upcoming Primaries

Ted Cruz and John Kasich Team Up to Defeat Trump in Upcoming Primaries

Ted Cruz and John Kasich released statements regarding their strategy in the upcoming primaries in Oregon, New Mexico, and Indiana. Kasich will provide space to Cruz in Indiana, while Cruz will back down in Oregon and New Mexico to allow Kasich to compete.

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  • Ted Cruz   Rafael Edward "Ted" Cruz (born December 22...
  • Ted Cruz
    Rafael Edward "Ted" Cruz (born December 22, 1970) is the junior United States Senator from Texas. Elected in 2013, he is the first Cuban-American or Latino to hold the office. Cruz is a member of the ...{ name: 'read more', link:'en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Cruz' }
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  • Donald Trump
    Donald John Trump Sr. (born June 14, 1946) is an American business magnate, investor, television personality and author. He is the chairman and president of The Trump Organization and the founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts. Trump's extravagant lifestyle, outspoken manner, and role on the NBC reality show The Apprentice have made him a well-known celebrity who was No. 17 on the 2011 Forbes Celebrity 100 list. Trump is the son of Fred Trump, a wealthy New York City real-estate developer. He worked for his father's firm, Elizabeth Trump & Son, while attending the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and in 1968 officially joined the company. He was given control of the company in 1971 and renamed it The Trump Organization. In 2010, Trump expressed an interest in becoming a candidate for President of the United States in the 2012 election, though in May 2011, he announced he would not run. Trump was a featured speaker at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). In 2013, Trump spent over $1 million to research a possible run for President of the United States in 2016. Trump is expected to make a formal announcement on whether he will run for President of the United States on June 16, 2015.
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  • John Kasich

    John Richard Kasich (/ˈksɨk/; born May 13, 1952) is an American politician who has served as the 69th Governor of Ohio since 2011. A member of the Republican Party, he served as a member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Ohio's 12th congressional district from 1983 to 2001. He was a commentator on Fox News Channel, hosting Heartland with John Kasich (2001–2007). He also worked as an investment banker, as managing director of Lehman Brothers' Columbus, Ohio office until the firm collapsed in 2008.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Kasich
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